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Suroor, Hasan: Who Killed Liberal Islam?
39,19 € *
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Erscheinungsdatum: 01.08.2019, Medium: Buch, Einband: Gebunden, Titel: Who Killed Liberal Islam?, Autor: Suroor, Hasan, Verlag: Rupa Publications, Sprache: Englisch, Schlagworte: FICTION // General, Rubrik: Belletristik // Romane, Erzählungen, Seiten: 258, Informationen: HC gerader Rücken mit Schutzumschlag, Gewicht: 494 gr, Verkäufer: averdo

Anbieter: averdo
Stand: 19.02.2020
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Suroor, Hasan: Who Killed Liberal Islam?
40,59 € *
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Erscheinungsdatum: 01.08.2019, Medium: Buch, Einband: Gebunden, Titel: Who Killed Liberal Islam?, Autor: Suroor, Hasan, Verlag: Rupa Publications, Sprache: Englisch, Schlagworte: FICTION // General, Rubrik: Belletristik // Romane, Erzählungen, Seiten: 258, Informationen: HC gerader Rücken mit Schutzumschlag, Gewicht: 494 gr, Verkäufer: averdo

Anbieter: averdo
Stand: 19.02.2020
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Radikal
39,00 € *
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Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Radikal is a daily Turkish language newspaper, published in Istanbul. It has been published since 1997 by Ayd n Do an''s Do an Media Group (Do an Medya Grubu). Unlike many daily newspapers in Turkey, Radikal does not seem to support a certain political party because the owner, Ayd n Do an, wants to keep his relations well with anyone who is in power. However, it is generally considered as a left-wing (left-liberal) newspaper. It is praised for its culture, arts, and interview sections, as well as columnists such as M. Serdar Kuzulo lu, Hakk Devrim, Y ld r m Türker, Türker Alkan, Altan Öymen, Nuray Mert. Hasan Celal Güzel, former minister of education, Murat Yetkin, and Mustafa Akyol, son of Taha Akyol, also write for Radikal.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 19.02.2020
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The Representation of the Ottoman Orient in Eig...
29,90 € *
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Noticing the importance of the fact that there is a growing interest in oriental countries and cultures, Hasan Baktir studies in his book the representation of the “Ottoman Orient” in 18th century English literature. He claims that a comprehensive understanding of the representation of the Ottoman Orient requires a new perspective, therefore, he investigates different aspects of the interaction between the Ottoman Orient and 18th century Europe. A number of questions continue to arise in the wake of Said’s 1978 landmark study, Orientalism. How monodirectional was the flow of power in such representations? To what extent did the travelling observer also participate and become influenced by the phenomena he tried to depict without attachment? What variety of motivations lay behind the desire to know and represent the Oriental other–was it simply a question of political control? Or were there deeper, more enigmatic factors at play–sexuality, existential affirmation, even utter idiosyncrasy? How various and diverse was the Western response to the East–can we discern degrees of sympathy, knowledge, and difference in the various Orients offered to us by the canonical and non-canonical figures of 18th century English letters? Baktir’s study provides answers to many aspects of these questions, through a detailed examination of very different texts. Baktir does not completely reject Said’s argument that European writers created a separate discourse to represent the Orient, rather, he shows us that there was also a dialogic and negotiating tendency which did not make a radical distinction between the East and the West. Relying his argument on 18th century pseudo-oriental letters, oriental tales, and oriental travelogues, Baktir demonstrates that the representation of the Ottoman Orient in 18th century English literature differs essentially from earlier centuries because a developing critical and liberal spirit established a negotiation between the two worlds. In his study he indicates how the critical and inquisitive spirit of the age of Enlightenment interanimated Oriental and European cultures.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 19.02.2020
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Alternative Conceptions of Civil Society
49,90 CHF *
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The idea of civil society has long been central to the Western liberal-democratic tradition, where it has been seen as a crucial site for the development and pursuit of basic liberal values such as individual freedom, social pluralism, and democratic citizenship. This book considers how a host of other ethical traditions define civil society. Unlike most studies of the subject, which focus on a particular region or tradition, it considers a range of ethical traditions rarely addressed in one volume: libertarianism, critical theory, feminism, liberal egalitarianism, natural law, Christianity, Islam, Judaism, and Confucianism. It considers the extent to which these traditions agree or disagree on how to define civil society's limits and how to evaluate its benefits and harms. A variety of distinguished advocates and interpreters of these traditions present in-depth explorations of how these various traditions think of ethical pluralism within societies, asking how a society should respond to diversity among its members. Together they produce a work rich with original insights on a wide range of subjects about which little has been written to date. An excellent starting point for a comparative ethics of civil society, this book concludes that while the concept of civil society originated in the liberal tradition, it is quickly becoming an important focus for a truly cross-cultural dialogue. In addition to the editors, the contributors are Michael Banner, Hasan Hanafi, Loren E. Lomasky, Richard Madsen, Michael A. Mosher, Michael Pakaluk, Anne Philips, Adam B. Seligman, Suzanne Last Stone, and Michael Walzer.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 19.02.2020
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Alternative Conceptions of Civil Society
44,99 € *
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The idea of civil society has long been central to the Western liberal-democratic tradition, where it has been seen as a crucial site for the development and pursuit of basic liberal values such as individual freedom, social pluralism, and democratic citizenship. This book considers how a host of other ethical traditions define civil society. Unlike most studies of the subject, which focus on a particular region or tradition, it considers a range of ethical traditions rarely addressed in one volume: libertarianism, critical theory, feminism, liberal egalitarianism, natural law, Christianity, Islam, Judaism, and Confucianism. It considers the extent to which these traditions agree or disagree on how to define civil society's limits and how to evaluate its benefits and harms. A variety of distinguished advocates and interpreters of these traditions present in-depth explorations of how these various traditions think of ethical pluralism within societies, asking how a society should respond to diversity among its members. Together they produce a work rich with original insights on a wide range of subjects about which little has been written to date. An excellent starting point for a comparative ethics of civil society, this book concludes that while the concept of civil society originated in the liberal tradition, it is quickly becoming an important focus for a truly cross-cultural dialogue. In addition to the editors, the contributors are Michael Banner, Hasan Hanafi, Loren E. Lomasky, Richard Madsen, Michael A. Mosher, Michael Pakaluk, Anne Philips, Adam B. Seligman, Suzanne Last Stone, and Michael Walzer.

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 19.02.2020
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